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Logo: Institut für Baumechanik und Numerische Mechanik/Leibniz Universität Hannover
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Logo: Institut für Baumechanik und Numerische Mechanik/Leibniz Universität Hannover
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Numerical Treatment of Inelastic Constitutive Behaviour within an ALE-Framework of Rolling

Bearbeitung:ext. M. Ziefle
Förderung durch:This work is financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG).
Bild Numerical Treatment of Inelastic Constitutive Behaviour within an ALE-Framework of Rolling

In this project calculation methods for the numerical contact analysis of rolling rubberlike solids are developed. As main application field here the tire problem is picked out. For the finite element analysis of rolling contact problems Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods are well established. These techniques enable a time independent formulation for elastic bodies under stationary rolling conditions and for local mesh refinement concentrated to the contact region. A drawback is on the computation of history dependent material properties because the path of material points is not traced inherently. This affects inelastic constitutive behavior as well as frictional contact. Following a fractional-step strategy the treatment of inelastic material behavior could be solved in this ALE-formulation. For this, an additional advection equation is used to describe the flux of the material particles through the fixed mesh. For the numerical solution of that equation a time discontinuous Galerkin (TDG) method is implemented and yields good results. The developed scheme can be used for any consistent constitutive model which is based on internal variables. The developed procedure is tested by the computation of a typical FE-Tire-Model.

Figure 1: FE-Mesh of rolling solid rubber disc.

 Figure 2: Frequency depending effects: a) normal contact pressure distribution, b) rolling resistance torque

Figure 3: Frequency depending effects: resulting normal contact force

 

Figure 4: Three different states of damage (max. 10%)

Figure 5: Evolution of internal damage variable

Figure 6: FE-model of a typical car tire.

Figure 7: Contact pressure maximum (in MPa) moves to leading edge

Figure 8: Maximum inelastic (viscoelastic) state moves to trailing edge

 

 

Übersicht